Bill Hammons: Writing and Running in Boulder, Colorado






BILL HAMMONS' GUIDE TO COLORADO FOURTEENERS

Challenger Point, Colorado

Challenger Point's Elevation: 14,081 Feet

Challenger Point's Rank Among Colorado's Fourteeners in Terms of Elevation: #34

Challenger Point is located in the Sangre de Cristo Range of mountains

Challenger Point is considered walkable

Best months for climbing Challenger Point are July through September

Click here for a Mapquest map of Challenger Point



Challenger Point, with an elevation of 14,081 feet, is the 34th highest peak in the state of Colorado. This Fourteener northwest of Kit Carson Peak was named after the space shuttle Challenger, which exploded 73 seconds after liftoff on January 28, 1986.

The hike to the summit of Challenger Point is described as "long and beautiful." Follow the signs from the trailhead to Willow Lake, and stay on the left (north) side of the lake once you reach it to follow the trail to above the cliffs. After that, follow the trail to the ridge to the south, staying to the right of a couloir leading directly to the ridge. Once you reach the ridge, follow it east to Challenger Point's summit. You'll know you've reached the summit when you read the following 6" x 12" plaque placed there on July 18, 1987:

CHALLENGER POINT, 14080+'
In Memory of the Crew of Shuttle Challenger
Seven who died accepting the risk,
expanding Mankind's horizons
January 28, 1986 Ad Astra Per Aspera
["Ad Astra Per Aspera" is Latin for "To the stars through aspiration"]

To reach the trailhead, head east from the south end of the town of Moffat into the town of Crestone via road T, until you see a sign on the right for Willow Creek Trailhead. Turn right and follow this paved road which becomes rough dirt through to the parking lot which most vehicles can reach.



Sources: localhikes.com, peakware.com, wikipedia.org



This page last updated 8/15/06



































































































































































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