Bill Hammons: Writing and Running in Boulder, Colorado






BILL HAMMONS' GUIDE TO COLORADO FOURTEENERS

Mount Lindsey, Colorado

Mount Lindsey's Elevation: 14,042 Feet

Mount Lindsey's Rank Among Colorado's Fourteeners in Terms of Elevation: #43

Mount Lindsey is located in the Sangre de Cristo Range of mountains

Mount Lindsey requires a scramble

Best months for climbing Mount Lindsey are June through September

Click here for a Mapquest map of Mount Lindsey



Mount Lindsey, with an elevation of 14,042 feet, is the 43rd highest peak in the state of Colorado. The mountain originally called "Old Baldy" was renamed in 1953 for Malcolm Lindsey (1880-1951), a member of the Colorado State Bar, the Episcopal Church and the Sons of the American Revolution. The summit and most of the mountain's southern flank are privately owned (requiring prior permission for access), and the eastern approaches are apparently not accessible under any circumstances, leaving the Huerfano Valley and Lindsey's northwest ridge as the safest and most convenient possible route (though even this approach is exposed and requires a scramble). The northwest approach also provides great views of Blanca Peak and Ellingwood Point.

To reach the Huerfano trailheads from Denver, take exit 52 off I-25 at Walsenberg (Colorado 69). Take 69 west for 25 miles to the town of Gardner, then, after Gardner, turn west off 69 towards Redwing. The road becomes well-grated dirt after five miles, then splits after 12 (take a left at the fork). Pass the Singing River Ranch with at least a high clearance 2WD and continue on to the lower Huerfano trailhead and the boundary of the San Isabel National Forest. The area has plenty of campsites. A 4WD vehicle will get you to the Upper Huerfano trailhead.



Sources: peakware.com, summitpost.org, wikipedia.org, A Climbing Guide to Colorado's Fourteeners by Walter R. Borneman and Lyndon J. Lampert



This page last updated 8/15/06



































































































































































Copyright © William Robert Hammons. All rights reserved. No portion of this site may be reproduced without the express written permission of the author, though linking to any portion of this site is encouraged (see the home page for details).