Bill Hammons: Writing and Running in Boulder, Colorado






BILL HAMMONS' GUIDE TO COLORADO FOURTEENERS

San Luis Peak, Colorado

San Luis Peak's Elevation: 14,014 Feet

San Luis Peak's Rank Among Colorado's Fourteeners in Terms of Elevation: #50

San Luis Peak is located in the San Juan Mountains

San Luis Peak is considered walkable

Best months for climbing San Luis Peak are June through September

Click here for a Mapquest map of San Luis Peak



San Luis Peak, with an elevation of 14,014 feet, is the 50th highest peak in the state of Colorado. San Luis is considered the most difficult Fourteener in the state to reach, being situated two hours from the nearest paved road, but the climb from the Stewart Creek trailhead (the most popular) is relatively easy. The Stewart Creek hike involves a 12-mile roundtrip and 3,600 feet of elevation gain.

To reach the Stewart Creek trailhead, head east from Gunnison along Highway 50 to CO 114 and take a right to follow that road for 20 miles before turning right onto dirt road NN14. Follow NN14 for seven miles, past the Dome Lakes, then turn right onto road 15GG (aka FS794). Then look for the signs for Stewart Creek trailhead, which is 21 miles down FS794 and on the right. The good news is that all of these roads are accessible to most passenger vehicles.

Follow Stewart Creek all the way to just past the west summit of Organ Mountain, at which point you'll turn south over an arm of Stewart Creek and ascend 807 feet to the saddle between Organ and San Luis. Then continue west half a mile to San Luis's summit.

It's recommended to start early to avoid afternoon thunderstorms.



Sources: peakware.com, summitpost.org, Dawson's Guide to Colorado's Fourteeners, Volume 2: The Southern Peaks



This page last updated 8/15/06



































































































































































Copyright © William Robert Hammons. All rights reserved. No portion of this site may be reproduced without the express written permission of the author, though linking to any portion of this site is encouraged (see the home page for details).